The History of Saratoga, New York

Happy Independence America! I’ve already watched some Fireworks to get in the spirit of our Independence, which occurred on July 4th, 1776, when the colonies wrote the Declaration of Independence. But did you know that my hometown, Saratoga Springs, New York has a lot to do with America winning it’s Independence?

In the past, I’ve written some detail about Saratoga National Historic Park, but I wanted to write another post on here of the history and the park in itself now that it’s Spring and you can really see what it has to offer.

While the Declaration of Independence was written in 1776, the war for freedom was just beginning. In fact, in September of 1777 through October of 177720180609_113958 the Battle of Saratoga began and is now known to many history buffs as the “Turning Point of The Revolutionary War”. It was in October of 1777 when British troops surrendered to American troops, a battle that would change the tide of the Revolutionary War in favor of the American colonists. This battle was significant because other countries, like France saw what happened and joined the war to fight for the freedom of America.

I love the history of Saratoga for this specifically, there is so much you can see and understand in just a few hours. To think that you can walk on land that was once walked on by the very people who gave this country it’s freedom always blows my mind.

When visiting the National Historic Park, you can experience it in many different ways in the Spring and Summer. You can walk the trail or bike it (roughly 9 miles), you can drive through it, or even take a horse (if you have one). There are reenactments done at different points in the year, as well as guides and maps that can explain everything to you. We went for a bike ride (it’s a hilly 9+miles if you do this) and stopped at each section of the trail to see views of the battlefield and read the markings left to explain the significance of each site.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It’s a great location to learn some history, get some exercise or even go to read and have a picnic. I’m hoping to have a lovely picnic there before the year ends — it’s on my summer bucket list. Once you’re done here, you can head to the Saratoga Monument and Victory Woods where you can learn more about the battlefield. Before walking through Victory Woods, you’ll pass through a cemetery filled with headstones from the 1700 and 1800’s, there could literally be Revolutionary and Civil War heroes buried in this cemetery. It’s an eerie feeling but one that helps you appreciate the magnitude of their sacrifice.

So, again, Happy Independence Day America! I’m so lucky to live in an area that had such a significant impact on our freedom.

6 thoughts on “The History of Saratoga, New York

  1. Nicole Anderson says:

    History always seem to take on a much more deeper meaning and understanding for us when we can actually visit places where significant events occurred. It gives it all a better dimension and makes it easier to picture how such actions would have unfolded. I can so relate to where you are coming from with this post.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.